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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

1 edition of case of spreading obliterative arteritis found in the catalog.

case of spreading obliterative arteritis

Gould, Alfred Pearce Sir

case of spreading obliterative arteritis

read February 8, 1884.

by Gould, Alfred Pearce Sir

  • 139 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in [London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Arteritis.,
  • Arteries -- Diseases.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby A. Pearce Gould... :
    The Physical Object
    Pagination10p. ;
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18399558M

    Tuberculous aortitis is a rare entity and its association with necrosis and perforation is even more unusual. Our pulmonary medicine service originally evaluated an elderly woman with a right pleural effusion and upper lobe infiltrate thought to be tuberculosis. An abdominal CT scan performed at that time showed extensive periaortic adenopathy. TEMPORAL ARTERITIS: A REPORT OF THREE CASES Wassermann reaction negative, and the cerebrospinal fluid normal. Aweek after admission a segment of the left tem- poral artery was excised and this was followed by relief of the headache. Afortnight after admission, eight weeks after the onset of the illness, the patient was discharged free from pain. Six months later he.

      In most cases, the arteries that pass through the temples are affected, hence the name. The condition is also called giant cell arteritis (GCA), Horton disease and cranial arteritis. In some cases, medium and large arteries in the shoulders, arms and other parts of the body are also affected.   [3.] Lupi-Herrera E, Sanchez Torres C, Marcushamer J et al. Takayasu Arteritis, clinical studies of cases. Am Heart J ; [4.] Ueno A, Awane G, Wakahayaci A. Successfully operated obliterative brachiocephalic arteritis (Takayasu) associated with elongated coarctation. Jap Heart J ; [5.].

    sumably an obliterative arteritis must have been present at that time. Later, 14 days after abruptly stopping prednisolone therapy, signs of a neuro-pathy appeared suddenly in hands and feet. It is likely that the simple "rheumatoid" arteritis had nowflared upandbecomea necrotizing arteritis or polyarteritis nodosa, onwhichcorticotropin hadno.   Before Takayasu. Researching old documents in relation to Takayasu arteritis, two papers have been found. In , Savory reported a case of a 22‐yr‐old female whose main arteries of both upper extremities and the left side of the neck were .


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Case of spreading obliterative arteritis by Gould, Alfred Pearce Sir Download PDF EPUB FB2

John H. Stone, in Goldman's Cecil Medicine (Twenty Fourth Edition), Buerger's Disease. Buerger's disease, also known as thromboangiitis obliterans, has a remarkably strong yet poorly understood association with cigarette r's disease does not occur in the absence of exposure to tobacco.

The vessels affected by Buerger's disease are the distal medium-sized arteries and veins. At the Dr. BURNEY YEO read an account of a case of Pyrexial autopsy obliterative arteritis of the subclavian, aorta, and Syphilis.

This case was admitted into King's College coronary arteries was discovered. The palse tracing was Hoapita.1 on Oct. 10th.with symptoms of pyrexia one showing a diminished calibre of the artery.

Al-Hassan HK, Abdul Sattar M, Eklof B. Embolic brain infarction: a rare complication of thoracic outlet syndrome. A report of two cases. J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino) ; 29 (3)–5. Gould AP. A case of spreading obliterative arteritis. Trans Clin Soc London. ; Gould AP.

Further notes of a case of obliterative by: 8. In our case, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, and obliterative arteritis were not seen and the number of IgG4-positive plasma cells did not reach the cut-off levels of the guidelines. However, given abnormally increased serum IgG4 levels and clinical improvement with steroids, this case is thought of to be IgG4-related lung by: 7.

Takayasu's arteritis. Cite this entry as: () Obliterative arteritis. In: Moreland L.W. (eds) Rheumatology and Immunology Therapy. Segmental thrombo-obliterative disease of branches of aortic arch; successful surgical treatment.

J Am Med Assoc. Mar 1; (9)– FROVIG AG, LOKEN AC. The syndrome of obliteration of the arterial branches of the aortic arch, due to arteritis; a post-mortem angiographic and pathological study.

For example, tapered smooth narrowing has been described in cases of giant cell arteritis (GCA) with coronary involvement. 9 In Takayasu's arteritis, three main types of coronary lesions have been described from angiographic and histologic analysis: Type 1, stenosis or occlusion of the ostia or proximal segments; Type 2, diffuse or focal.

In spite of clinically normal temporal arteries, and the absence of headache, temporal artery biopsy revealed giant cell arteritis. Discussion: aortic arch syndrome is an important but under‐appreciated complication of giant cell arteritis and may be the presenting feature.

In this case, it resulted in falls consequent upon arm claudication. Case Report: We report two cases of double RCA incidentally found in electrocuted patients. Both cases showed double RCA arising from separate ostia. On microscopy, both right coronaries showed no significant pathology in the first case while in the second case, the posterior RCA showed features of obliterative arteritis.

This diagnosis is an important consideration in all cases of new onset headache in elderly subjects. Reports of giant cell arteritis are few and far between in the Indian subcontinent.

In this report, we describe the clinical details of four cases of giant cell arteritis, detected at Guwahati, Assam. The four patients were in the age group. However, Duker and colleagues 85 reported the case of a patient with a severe bilateral, obliterative, retinal arteritis, and phlebitis.

There are case reports of both bilateral and unilateral retinal vasculitis with Crohn's disease. 86, 87 The disorder appeared to respond to systemic corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide therapy. endarteritis obliterans[¦end‚ärtə′rīdəs ō′blitə‚ränz] (medicine) Endarteritis, particularly of small arteries, accompanied by degeneration of the intima, leading to occlusion of the blood vessel.

Also known as obliterating endarteritis. Endarteritis Obliterans a chronic disease of. Consequently, this is the first case report to provide histological evidence of PH associated with IgG4-related lung disease.

In this case, PH was considered to be caused by obliterative phlebitis from IgG4-positive plasma cells, which was hemodynamically similar to pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. juvenile obliterative arteritis as a group in which the lesions begin in small vessels and mayspread proximally.

Theysuggestthatthis groupappears to correspond to that described by Buerger and-concede that it may be a pathological entity, but consider that in many other cases of obliterative arterial disease in young adults in whom the lesions. senile arterial disease-very usually obliterative arteritis affecting the lower limbs.

And, with one exception (Fig. 9b), all the illustrations were recorded in one year ()-in two hospital clinics, and private practice-so that it will be appreciated that such, more or less incidental, electrocardiographic findings are very common.

These. an infant with Takayasu's arteritis and bilateral renal artery stenosis after bilateral renal autotransplantation. We report three boys (one an infant) with the likely diagnosis of Takayasu's arteritis and renal artery stenosis seen at this hospital.

In all three patients renal autotransplantation has been suc-cessful. Case reports Case 1. The major manifestations of giant cell arteritis have been well described.

Pulmonary manifestations, however, are rare. We report the case of a 75 year old woman with temporal arteritis, presenting with atypical manifestations, i.e. nodular pulmonary lesions, dry cough, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and otitis with hearing loss. We conclude that overlapping features of giant cell arteritis and.

Takayasu arteritis 2. Giant cell (temporal) arteritis 3. Kawasaki disease 4. Wegeners granulomatosis 5. Buergers disease 6. Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) 7. obliterative arteritis Rarely does acoronary artery contain a gumma.I6 Angina and AM1 may result from syphilic coro- nary disease.2" Malarial parasites and parasitized red blood cells also may plug larger coronary arteries.2s, 2s6 Schisto- soma hematobium has been found in a major epicardial coro- nary artery unassociated with MI   In this case, however, the patient had a condition known as giant cell arteritis (GCA), also known as temporal arteritis or cranial arteritis.

This illness usually begins in patients over 50 years old. The results of a blood test, called the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The characteristics of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who develop obliterative bronchiolitis characterised by severe airflow obstruction have been hitherto poorly investigated.

A retrospective study of 25 patients with RA and functional evidence of obliterative bronchiolitis (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC).Lisa M.

Miller, Arnon Gal, in Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease (Sixth Edition), Arteritis and Vasculitis. Arteritis occurs as a feature of many infectious and immune-mediated diseases (Box ).Often, all types of vessels are affected rather than only arteries, and then vasculitis or angiitis (a term that includes blood and lymphatic vessels) is the term applied to the lesions.Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about The BMJ.

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